Marvelous Mechanical Motions
Dale Dougherty, makezine.com
Pat Kon­kle, a retired machin­ist from Col­orado, cre­at­ed a set of mechan­i­cal dis­plays that demon­strate a vari­ety of work­ing gears. It’s an amaz­ing piece of work. Mike Neden of Pitts­burg State’s Kansas Tech­nol­o­gy Cen­ter came upon the…

Marvelous Mechanical Motions
Dale Dougherty, makezine.com

Pat Kon­kle, a retired machin­ist from Col­orado, cre­at­ed a set of mechan­i­cal dis­plays that demon­strate a vari­ety of work­ing gears. It’s an amaz­ing piece of work. Mike Neden of Pitts­burg State’s Kansas Tech­nol­o­gy Cen­ter came upon the…

dugnorth.com

The sound of the ball on the track imme­di­ate­ly sat­is­fied me that there is fric­tion in this sys­tem and thus can­not run indef­i­nite­ly. Still, it appears to be remark­ably effi­cient and the in …

devidsketchbook:

AMAZING KINETIC SCULPTURES BY BOB POTTS

Bob Potts is a kinetic Sculptor in upstate New York. His work renders motions inspired by nature into graceful and silent mechanical forms. The craftsmanship of his work is visible in every detail.

[ gif made by DevidSketchbook ]

archiemcphee:

American artist Dave Cole transforms existing machinery into awesome new devices with functions completely unrelated to their original purpose. In 2012 he transformed a 22,000 pound steam roller into The Music Box. Instead of flattening surfaces the machine now plays the “Star Spangled Banner.”

Though Cole stripped most of the weight out of the compactor to make the sculpture more manageable, it still weighs in at 2,000 pounds. The sculpture was commissioned by the Cleveland Institute of Art.

Click here to watch a video of The Music Box in action.

Back in 2005 Dave Cole created The Knitting Machine. Two enormous excavators were fitted with 20-foot-long knitting needles and positioned across from each other. Working together they knitted an oversized American flag. Click here to watch video footage of The Knitting Machine.

[via Juxtapoz and Laughing Squid]

steampunktendencies:

Steam of ConsciousnessHandmade polyurethane skull (1/2 scale) with fully functioning custom built miniature steam engine. Materials: Brass, carbon steel, stainless steel, glass, polyurethane, and wood. Size: 6” x 9” (15 cm x 23 cm) including glass dome. Christopher Conte

steampunktendencies:

Steam of Consciousness
Handmade polyurethane skull (1/2 scale) with fully functioning custom built miniature steam engine. 
Materials: Brass, carbon steel, stainless steel, glass, polyurethane, and wood. 
Size: 6” x 9” (15 cm x 23 cm) including glass dome. Christopher Conte

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Artist Turns Ball Pit Into An Insane Mechanical Playground

Over the past few years, we’ve written a lot about Niklas Roy. The work of the German artist, and so-called “inventor of useless things” has become something of a fixture on our site, so it’s with great pleasure that we bring you the newest in innocuous ingenuity.

Suck the Balls! The aptly-titled pneumatic playground Roy has designed for the Goethe Institute, Krakow, makes us yearn back to our childhoods. Featuring a massive ball pit surrounded by 80 meters of pneumatic tubing, it’s exactly the right kind of useless that produces the sort of documentation video you’ll remember for the rest of your day:

From Roy’s website: 

The installation consists of a ball pit and an 80 meters long pneumatic tube transport, which fills up the entire historic staircase of the Potocki Palace in Kraków. When entering the ball pit, the cabin’s lights switch on and the ball suction action starts! The visitor can operate the peculiar machinery with a suction spout. When sucking the balls which are surrounding his feet, the balls race through the transparent pipe system, creating a visually stunning scene. The journey of the little balls ends in a container above the ball pit, waiting for the climax of the operation: When the visitor pulls the release handle of the container, a fountain of balls splashes down onto his head in a joyful shower.

A helmet is provided to keep the hairstyle in excellent condition throughout the whole experience.

Enjoy more sparks of useless imagination from Niklas Roy on his website, and check out Suck the Balls! at Goethe Institute, Krakow, through December 2014.

VTDEO

http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/artist-turns-ball-pit-into-insane-mechanical-playground

(via hifructosemag)

dugnorth.com

Check out his wood automa­ton that depicts the splash after a water droplet hits a body of water.

From the video descrip­tion:

The object of this project was to produce an Automata [sic] that was inspir …

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday
The Litter Bug - Anthropod sub-species of the Insecta class
by UK metal-work artist Mark Oliver 

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday

The Litter Bug - Anthropod sub-species of the Insecta class

by UK metal-work artist Mark Oliver 

(Source: ronbeckdesigns, via hifructosemag)

drrestless:

Detail and whole-page gif showing the Earth’s tilt as it orbits the Sun. An appropriate picture for solstice, the point at which the Sun reaches its lowest altitude in the sky for us Northern Hemispherians on this the 21st of December. From here on out, things are looking a little brighter, at least until June. Those 23.4 degrees remain titled in the same direction as the Earth goes around the Sun, meaning the pole pointing away from the Sun while orbiting half of the year will point towards the Sun for the other half. 

From Iconographic Encyclopedia of Science, Literature, and Art (1852) by Johann Georg Heck and Spencer F. Baird

(Source: smithsonianlibraries)

longnowsalon:

Today Long Now debuted a 10-second animated intro that will soon be seen at the start of all Long Now videos. It’s a glimpse at what 20,000 years ticking by on a virtual version of The 10,000 Year Clock would look like. It uses actual sound and design work for the real clock (a work in progress) and features sound composed by Brian Eno.

Proving the long-term can be contemplated in small increments… more here.

object42:

The Long Now foundation & The 10,000 Year Clock

Thinking of time and the future. What constitues ‘future-proof’? A clock being built in Texas to last 10,000 years made from marine grade stainless steel & hi-tech ceramics.

Also the two most iconic images from the 20th Century: the mushroom cloud over Nagasaki, and the view of the Earth from space. Both triggered seismic shifts in the thinking of us and our roles in relation to our planet and the future.

© adamtheautomaton,
gonzoblog-theme is a free Tumblr Theme, designed by gonzodesign. ~ Tumblr This Theme is proudly powered by: Tumblr ~ RSS subscribe to RSS.